Wartime hero finally rewarded for his courage

David Williams, who served as a Warrant Officer in Bomber Command during the Second World War, with his family  and officers from RAF Halton at a ceremony to receive his Bomber Command Clasp.
David Williams, who served as a Warrant Officer in Bomber Command during the Second World War, with his family and officers from RAF Halton at a ceremony to receive his Bomber Command Clasp.
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An elderly man who served three tours of duty during his youth in the Second World War has finally received a clasp in recognition of his immense bravery, patriotism and duty.

David Williams, a retired head master who has lived in Butlers Cross for 40 years, served as a navigator in the RAF with Bomber Command in the 1940s.

He received his clasp from RAF Halton’s Station Commander, Group Captain Simon Harper at a personal ceremony attended by his close family.

HIs daughter Sally said: “My brother Robin wrote to the Station Commander to ask if someone in uniform could rpesent the clasp to our father and they really ran with it and wanted to do it.”

Mr Williams has strong links with Halton as he spent 15 years as headmaster at Halton Middle School prior to his retirmeent, and was an honour member of Halton House Officers’ Mess.

“It was a very special day for the family,” said Miss Williams. “He is in failing health now but he enjoyed the day, he nodded at everything read in the citation. We are so proud of our father, that generation had a tremendous sense of duty and unselfishness.”

He completed night bombings on ememy ports in 1943 and suffered two broken ankles and a broken leg when being pulled from the wreckage of a crashed aircraft later that year.

Undeterred he returned to active operations the following eyar in JUne, and was in the air over the beaches in Normandy during the D-Day landings. In July of that year he was honoured with the Distinguished Flying Medal. Then volunteered for a third tour of duty and was involved in dropping secret agents and equipment inside occupied territory.

On July 31st 1946 he was demobbed and left the RAF to embarked on his teaching career

Bomber Command suffered the highest casualty rate of the British Armed Forces in the Second World War, losing 55,573 of the 125,000 who served.

But their contribution was overlooked at the end of the war when they were denied a campaign medal for politcal reasons.

Earlier this year David Cameron sought to retify this ommision and declared a clasp would be awarded to Bomber Command veterans who had been treated ‘inconsistently’ with their Fighter Command counterparts.

To that end Warrant Officer (Retd) Cecil David Williams was presented with the Bomber Command Clasp at a personal ceremony by RAF Halton’s Station Commander, Group Captain Simon Harper.