Tributes to popular swimmer and choir man who died aged 80 having suffered from polio since childhood

Obit - Ted Turner pictured here at Stoke Mandeville Pool having taken part in a sponsored swim in aid of the Decemeber Festival Choir in October 1989
Obit - Ted Turner pictured here at Stoke Mandeville Pool having taken part in a sponsored swim in aid of the Decemeber Festival Choir in October 1989
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The funeral of a popular disabled choir singer, sportsman and keen fundraiser will be held on Friday.

Ted Turner, 80, of Aylesbury, died from pneumonia in the early hours of Christmas morning after suffering from the muscle wasting disease, polio, since he was four years old.

Despite struggling with the disease, his daughters, Pauline Cunningham and Linda Studd, said he refused to let his disability stand in his way.

Mrs Cunningham, said: “He liked taking control of his own life. He was a very happy person and always put others first. He was always singing and smiling.”

Mr Turner joined the Aylesbury Festival Choir more than 25 years ago and always took on new challenges to raise money for them including many sponsored swims at Stoke Mandeville for the Disabled Swimming Club despite being unable to use his legs.

Mrs Cunningham added: “He’s done so much for everybody else. We are still talking about him, it’s no more than he deserves.”

Despite his deteriorating health in recent years his daughters admitted his death still came as a shock after he had a ‘bit of a lift in him’ before dying peacefully in his sleep.

Mrs Cunningham said: “Before he went we told him we were proud of him, we were happy and he was amazing.”

Both his daughters said they always felt close to their father because he raised them largely on his own after the death of their mother.

Mrs Studd added: “There was always this connection.

“He knew he made us happy.

Mr Turners’ memorial will be held on Friday at Amersham’s Milton Chapel at 10.45am with a wake then being held at the Rivets Sports and Social Club at 12.30pm.

Both are free for the public to attend.