Magical installations at Waddesdon Manor create artistic dusk

Waddesdon Manor is magical at any time of year, but as winter approaches it takes on a breathtaking beauty.

The house has been dressed for the festive season with an Austrian theme and rooms and corridors are filled with magnificent pine trees.

Waddesdon Manor - Winter Light by Bruce Munroe - This piece is called Water-Towers

Waddesdon Manor - Winter Light by Bruce Munroe - This piece is called Water-Towers

But it is outside where the real charm lies.

Trees and twinkling lights come into their own as dusk falls, giving the house and gardens a fairy tale quality.

And this year the lights are not only to be found on trees.

Light artist Bruce Monro has produced Winter Light at Waddesdon, an installation of six fascinating works of art to be found on a trail around the grounds.

Waddesdon Manor - Winter Light by Bruce Munroe - This piece is called River of Light

Waddesdon Manor - Winter Light by Bruce Munroe - This piece is called River of Light

With titles including Brass Monkeys, Water Towers and Tepees, Mr Munro told invited guests at the official opening: “I wanted to create works of light from the heart, with humour and invention.”

Perhaps the most surprising piece is Water Towers, which upon closer inspection reveals it is actually created from thousands of plastic water bottles. Visitors can walk amongst the coloured towers and listen to music to appreciate the conversion of sound and colour.

Mr Munro spent several years living in Australia, where he worked in a light factory.

This experience gave him a technical background which he has merged with his training in fine art to create unique works.

The most beautiful of his installations at Waddesdon is undoubtedly River of Light (pictured left), a cascade of 6,500 illuminated glass spheres located at Daffodil Valley, which in spring and summer is home to sheets of daffodils and wild orchids.

The spheres are threaded with coiled fibre optics mounted on individual stems, creating the effect of a river changing colour in subtle hues of blues and greens as it moves.

Mr Munro said: “I am a professional daydreamer, I make a living out of daydreaming. If you move people’s spirits and hearts I think that’s a worthy reason for doing something.”

The installations can be seen from dusk onwards, Wednesdays to Sundays, until January.