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Back in Time 1910: Remembering one of the Vale’s lost railways

The Verney Junction pictured in its heyday in 1910, some 104 years ago, all that remains today are empty platforms and rusty rails

The Verney Junction pictured in its heyday in 1910, some 104 years ago, all that remains today are empty platforms and rusty rails

  • by Karl Vaughan, Aylesbury historian
 

We travel some 10 miles away from Aylesbury this week to look at one of the area’s many lost railway stations – Verney Junction.

It was opened in 1868 on the Aylesbury and Buckingham line.

The station was near Claydon House and the owner, Sir Harry Verney invested a lot of money in the scheme. Because of this the station was named after him.

Also down the line was Calvert Station which too was named after Sir Harry as his original surname was Calvert.

This photograph from around 1910 shows Verney Junction in its heyday.

At that time there were connections to Buckingham, Bletchley, Oxford and Aylesbury but its location was so remote that it wasn’t long before traffic began to diminish.

In 1936 the line to Quainton Road was closed, severing it from Aylesbury and beyond and in 1968 the station was closed for good.

Today only the station platforms and rusty rails indicate what was once there.

In the next few years the line will get a new breath of life. East West Rail has been busy clearing the way in preparation for the new Varsity Line which will connect Oxford with Bedford and eventually Cambridge.

 

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