Event showcases findings of dig at site of old pig farm

A Roman stone-lined well - one of the discoveries from a dig at Site F, the site of a proposed housing development just to the north-west of Thame
A Roman stone-lined well - one of the discoveries from a dig at Site F, the site of a proposed housing development just to the north-west of Thame

The results of a dig at the site of an old pig farm to the north-west of Thame are to be showcased at an archaeological event in the town.

Artefacts, items and evidence of life in Thame dating from the Roman, Saxon and Iron Ages will be displayed at this special event at Thame Town Hall on Saturday July 23.

An excavation by Oxford Cotswold Archaeology took place on the site of the old farm in 2015.

The location is known as Site F on the Thame Neighbourhood Plan, and the dig took place after proposals were announced by Bloor Homes to build more than 200 new homes on the land.

The dig found evidence of a Neolithic henge, a causewayed enclosure, Iron Age roundhouses, a ritual burial, a Roman well and sunken featured buildings from the Saxon period.

These were all supported by artefacts in the form of tools, coinage, pottery and human remains.

Becky Peacock, project officer at Oxford Archaeology said: “The enclosure is of national significance.

“It is very large and is evidence of early settlement there.

“There was no evidence of the enclosure so it was a unique and surprising discovery.

“The finds are currently being stored in our office but the hope is that eventually some of the items will be on display at museums in Thame and Oxford.”

Maps, plans, photographs, and actual artefacts from the site will be on display in the Town Hall on July 23 between 10.30am and 4pm.

Archaeologists who worked on the dig will be on hand to explain the significance of the site and to answer any questions.

The event is free and features two introductory talks in the morning, followed by an afternoon for browsing, object handling, and children’s activities.

Some of the previous work and trenching was carried out by John Moore Archaeological Services.