Ancient remains from Arla dig set to go on display

Skeleton found during archeological dig at Arla site
Skeleton found during archeological dig at Arla site
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Historical treasures discovered during archaeological work at the Arla Foods dairy site will be on display at a public open evening later this month.

People are invited to view Iron Age and Roman artefacts uncovered during the archaeological study of the site which will include pottery, metalwork, coins and jewellery as well as images of skeletons found in burial sites.

Ancient pot uncovered in an archeological dig at Arla.

Ancient pot uncovered in an archeological dig at Arla.

The 12-week study by Prospect Archaeology was completed in February 2012 and revealed late Iron Age, early Roman and later Roman enclosures, as well as 10 inhumation burials and five cremation burials.

Although the settlement was low status, large quantities of pottery, a ‘dolphin’ brooch and a bronze cosmetic implement were all recovered.

Nansi Rosenberg from Prospect Archaeology, said: “Now that we have cleaned, catalogued and assessed all of the artefacts that were uncovered at the site, we are looking forward to sharing our findings with the residents of Aston Clinton and providing the opportunity for them to see some of the results of the excavation first hand. It promises to be an interesting and informative evening as we reveal more about Aylesbury Vale’s long history.”

Meanwhile, work on the dairy is running according to the time schedule. Press officer Amanda Hare said: “We have taken delivery of the processing equipment and that is being installed at the moment.

View - Arla development from Buckland bridge

View - Arla development from Buckland bridge

“A key date for us is the beginning of August when Arla Foods will take control of the site and start milk trials.”

The dairy is expected to start production in the autumn.

The open evening will be held on Thursday, June 20 from 7pm-9pm at Buckland Village Hall.

A 40-minute presentation entitled ‘Once it was a boggy field: Iron Age and Roman tenacity in Buckinghamshire’, will be given by Carol Simmons, who directed the excavation.

Pre-booking for the open evening is not required.