Boyce’s family dreaming of another big Wembley day out

Boyce's brothers Rodney Hoyte (grey top), Patrick Hoyte (black top), sisters Joanne Hoyte (black top) and Steph anie Boyce and mum Lucille Boyce look over their relative's newspaper cuttings and accomplishments
Boyce's brothers Rodney Hoyte (grey top), Patrick Hoyte (black top), sisters Joanne Hoyte (black top) and Steph anie Boyce and mum Lucille Boyce look over their relative's newspaper cuttings and accomplishments
0
Have your say

Wigan may be some distance away but Aylesbury still had its place at the FA Cup semi-final courtesy of Emmerson Boyce.

The defender, born and bred in the town, captained his side to a 2-0 victory over Millwall at Wembley Stadium last Saturday, setting up a final clash with Manchester City and leaving his family immensely proud.

Emmerson’s parents, brothers and sisters all still live in Aylesbury, including his sister, Stephanie Boyce, 40.

She said: “We can’t wait for the final. We’re just waiting to hear about tickets.

“It would be the crowning game of his career if they win.

“The possibility of him captaining the side on May 11 is exciting and slightly overwhelming.”

For all the talk of empty seats at Wembley Stadium on Saturday ‘Boycie’s’ family and friends formed a small army of support to cheer on the former Quarrendon School pupil. Proud dad Melvin arranged a bus for almost 50 people to the game. And every generation was there, too.

The Luton Town legend’s grandmother, 92, turned up while the youngest cheering him on was just two-years-old.

For the 33 year old it is a long way from his days turning out for Bedgrove Dynamos and his mum, Lucille, driving him to training.

She said: “Sometimes you didn’t even know where you are going. It was hard work back then but it has paid off.”

Stephanie added: “He’s never forgotten his roots. He’s never forgotten Aylesbury and he always remembers here.”

Stephanie revealed they still keep all of Boyce’s newspaper cuttings and send them to friends and family back in Barbados.

And brother, Patrick Hoyte, said they have become accustomed to their brother’s high profile.

He said: “You get a bit blasé now when you are lying on your bed and then your brother pops up on TV. It’s like ‘oh there’s Em again’.”